• Users Online: 32
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 41-43

Cyclical vomiting syndrome in children: potential role of electroencephalogram in the diagnostic evaluation


Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore. KhooTeckPuat-National University Children’s Medical Institute, National University Health System

Correspondence Address:
Tan L N Michelle
Department of Paediatrics, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore. KhooTeckPuat-National University Children’s Medical Institute, National University Health System

Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


Rights and PermissionsRights and Permissions

Aim: Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome (CVS) is a functional disorder in childhood which is increasingly being recognized. The pathogenesis of CVS remains unknown but there appears to be a link between CVS and migraine, suggestive of a central aetiology. We aimed to determine the utility of electroencephalograms (EEG) in the diagnostic algorithm of a child suspected to have CVS. Methods: We conducted a retrospective review of children who have been diagnosed with CVS in our unit since 1999 when EEGs were performed as part of the diagnostic evaluation. Results: There were 48 children with recurrent vomiting in whom the clinical diagnosis of CVS was entertained. Median age of onset was 4 years (6 months-12 years). Of the 48 patients, 27received a final diagnosis of CVS/abdominal migraine, following normal investigations which included abdominal x-ray, barium study, abdominal ultrasound and screen for inborn errors of metabolism (IEM); 21 received other diagnosis which included, non-specific abdominal colic (12), hiatal hernia (1), epilepsy (3) and IEM (1). Of the 27 with CVS/abdominal migraine, 21 had EEG features consistent with mild encephalopathy during an acute attack. Twelve of them had a repeat EEG when clinically well, and all but 1 showed normalization. Conclusions: In our series, 78% demonstrated transient electrographic changes of acute encephalopathy during the acute attacks. The use of EEG in the appropriate clinical context may provide additional evidence to support the diagnosis of CVS in patients without other aetiologies for mild acute encephalopathy.


[PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed164    
    Printed6    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded22    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal